Kris Northern

Of Bicycles, Sound Design and Glacial Flood Channels

I find it especially difficult to shift gears after a productive and intense winter of creative seclusion, so much so that the thought of being out of the studio and away from service for 4 days creates a tangible anxiety for me. I try to remember that those feelings are par for the course and within 15 minutes of hopping on a bike you get some perspective as to how silly they really are as they melt away. As my time gets more and more sparse I find myself ganging interests up, so that I'm in pretty ridiculous situations where I'm in the middle of nowhere biking my equipment to an outdoor event to DJ my latest favorites in electroacoustic sound design music, (here's a link to a recording of this set) photographing and studying geology and taking notes on rock formations for my artwork.

This is similar to a bike trip I took last year but I took an entirely different route this year and was joined by the newest member of the Extreme Raver Adventure Club, my wonderful wife, Alisha. We started off by listening to the second appearance of Randall Carlson on the Joe Rogan Experience where he discusses the nearly incomprehensible cataclysmic geological changes that affected the area we would be biking in, namely the Grand Coulee and the Moses Coulee around the melting of the last Ice Age. I highly recommend everyone check out this particular podcast as it really did a number on the way I view human civilization in a geological time scale.

We started off at DryFalls which is where Lake Missoula, a lake that existed around 12,000 years ago that extended from the Pacific Ocean to Montana and was said to contain 5x the water of the Great Lakes.
We then biked in through the North part of the Moses Coulee which is in some ways more impressive than the south entrance. The trip all and all was around 110-120 miles with some heavy grade changes and offroad action and 1 rattlesnake. Since I have captions on most of the photos I'm going to skip a long detailed recounting of our trip. Enjoy.

Last StretchAlisha stretching before we tackle the steep incline leaving the north entrance to the Moses Coulee.
Spring Blooms
Alisha At DryfallsDryfalls is said to be the largest waterfall to ever have been known to exist. This is where Lake Missoula drained out in the last Ice age melt around 12,000 years ago. As it flowed downhill from here it cut out the Grand Coulee which is monumental in its size.
BasaltA particular nice showing of the basalt layers that cover most of Oregon and Washington from ~17 million years ago
Overlooking the Billingsley RanchThis is the high scabland above Billingsley ranch which has to be one of the coolest ranches I've ever seen. It is completely surrounded by these cut basalt clifffaces. We camped in this highground on BLM land andit was one of the more epic places we've slept in.
Springtime A brief show of color for springtime in the Moses Coulee.
ErracticThese boulders are called Erractics.They are usually carried by glaciers or the subsequent melt water to fields far from their sources.
She hates it.Alisha is not a fan of this hill. Or hills in general. No sir, she does not enjoy the burl and gnarl the same way I do =)
ScablandThis valley is the very top entrance of the southern leg of the Moses Coulee. If I am correct it is called scabland and has some very odd and interesting formations. I think its absolutely gorgeous. Its fun to imagine the flow of water that cut the rock layers you bike down into the canyon.
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RattlesnakeMan. This guy was sunbathing and blended right into the rocks. I didnt see him until I was really close and couldnt really quickly move the bike as It was downhill on gravel and I was carrying quite a bit of weight on the bike. He lunged and came within 6 inchs. Quite scary and a clear lesson to pay attention and wear jeans. Next year Im gonna kill clean and cook them for dinner.
Palisades and Talus
DryfallsDryfalls is said to be the largest waterfall to ever have been known to exist. This is where Lake Missoula drained out in the last Ice age melt around 12,000 years ago. As it flowed downhill from here it cut out the Grand Coulee which is monumental in its size.
Dryfalls Dryfalls is said to be the largest waterfall to ever have been known to exist. This is where Lake Missoula drained out in the last Ice age melt around 12,000 years ago. As it flowed downhill from here it cut out the Grand Coulee which is monumental in its size.
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